Try “No-Till” in your vegetable garden

Soil scientists now realize that tilling interferes with the soil’s complicated relationship and the micro-organisms that keep the ground healthy and productive. Tilling also compacts the soil, brings long-dormant weed seeds to the surface sale, and adds to erosion.

November in the Garden

La Nina is messing with our weather again. The National Weather Service reports above normal temperatures and below normal precipitation in our area and most of the U.S. for November, December and January. Being forewarned is being forearmed. You might want to consider installing drip irrigation for your vegetables and your ornamental

Chores for the June Garden

Summer heat is arriving with its usual ferocity. Some plants may be suffering from it– as well as some of us. That’s no reason to stop our favorite pastime. Here are some helpful hints to prepare for the coming dog days.

Vegetables for your Fall Garden

Believe it or not, fall is the best vegetable growing season along the Gulf Coast. Snap beans, all the brassica, Swiss Chard, Cucumbers, potatoes, squash (summer and winter), tomatoes and turnips can be put in now or shortly. Others like carrots, beets, garlic, lettuce, mustard, onions, parsley, radishes, spinach and turnips can wait until November.

Vegetables to plant in your summer garden*

Don’t know why they’re called “southern” peas. Does that mean that only people in the south eat them? They’re also called “cowpeas”, because they were also used as cattle feed. However, give me a plate of purple hulls cooked down with some bacon and onions (and a little jalapeno thrown in for good measure), add a pork chop and some fresh tomatoes, and I’m in heaven. I’ve been known to make a meal out of purple hulls and bread. And crowder peas are my absolute favorite.