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Tag: Soil

Healthy soil

Soil-The Living Layer of Earth

All these creatures and entities are involved in the tremendous work of decomposing everything in their sight, and reducing these to their basic elements of carbon, nitrogen and other necessary nutrients into a material that plant roots can take up and provide to the rest of the plant.

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Making Your Soil Fertile

I definitely prefer organic methods. I make my own compost- although I can never make enough to meet my needs. I do buy a lot, but I purchase it from local organic compost manufacturers. You can find a local organic composter near your area here.

What is Soil? It’s not just dirt!

An ideal soil would consist of the above concentrations of minerals and organic matter and the other 50 percent would include 25 percent air and 25 percent water in the porous areas.

Mike Serant of Microlife discusses organic fertilizers and lawn products

“When any organism is fed the highest nutrition possible, that organism will hit it’s optimum potential and have the least amount of problems.”

Interview with Soil Scientist John Ferguson

John Ferguson is a soil scientist and owner of Nature’s Way Resources, an organic compost and soil facility located in Montgomery County.

The world under our feet

ll the living beings that reside in the soil, all the minerals and elements that lay inside that structure, form not just a self-contained ecosystem which exists under our feet, but a truly ancient and rich ecosystem, tied inexorably toall the other ecosystems on the planet.

Earthworms and the art of grass cutting

Charles Darwin, almost a century and a half ago, did understand. His book, “Earthworms”, published in 1881, was the result of years of study into these seemingly insignificant creatures. In his manuscript he noted “It may be doubted whether there are as many other animals which have played so important a part in the history of the world, as have these lowly organized creatures.”

Are you connected to Earth’s Natural Internet?

If one digs into leaf mold, or into really good soil, tiny white filaments resembling spider webs can be seen spreading through the soil or leaves. This is mycorrhiza. Though deceptively small, a teaspoon of good soil can have eight or nine feet of the tiny strings.

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